Call for Abstract

7th World congress on Hospice and Palliative care, will be organized around the theme “”

hospice 2020 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in hospice 2020

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Geriatrics is a specialty that focuses on health care of elderly people. It aims to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. There is no set age at which patients may be under the care of a geriatrician or geriatric physician, a physician who specializes in the care of elderly people. Rather, this decision is determined by the individual patient's needs, and the availability of a specialist. Geriatrics differs from standard adult medicine because it focuses on the unique needs of the elderly person. The aged body is different physiologically from the younger adult body, and during old age, the decline of various organ systems becomes manifest. Previous health issues and lifestyle choices produce a different constellation of diseases and symptoms in different people.

Palliative care and Rehabilitation medicine share the most common goals. They strive to maximize physical function and emotional well-being to the highest extent possible given the nature of the underlying disease process. Many patients with End-Stage disease experience symptoms and functional losses that diminish their quality of life.

Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role on palliative and hospice care teams by identifying life roles and activities (“occupations”) that are meaningful to patients and addressing barriers to performing these activities. Unlike other health care providers, they consider both the physical and psychosocial/ behavioral health needs of the patient, focusing on what is most important to him or her to accomplish, the available resources and support systems, and the environments in which the patients want and can participate.

Spiritual care is an essential domain of palliative care, which focuses on the needs of the whole person and their family. Spirituality is a fundamental element of human experience. It includes the character’s search for meaning and determination in life and the experience of the superior. For some people spirituality can be largely faith based, for others it may be their relationship with nature or the profound connections they have with their people. Spirituality may or may not involve devout opinions.

Emergency medicine has progressively taken a central role in the early execution of palliative care. Patients with a serious disease are likely to find themselves in an emergency section at some point along their course of illness, and they should expect to receive high-quality palliative care in that setting. Common integration of palliative care into the day-to-day practice of emergency medicine, however, is often exposed by the demands of many competing priorities.

‘’Nursing is primarily assisting the individual in the performance of those activities contributing to health and its recovery, or to a peaceful death’’ Virginia’s definition of Nursing. The role of Nursing in palliative care is to provide relief for physical symptoms, achieving quality of life, maintaining an independent patient, relief for mental anguish and social isolation, family support, reducing isolation, fear and anxiety and good death or dying well.

Oncology deals to the patient of cancer for medically treatment. The patients suffered so much by the medical treatment from side effects and emotional issues. Palliative care provides professional treatment and provide the treatment against the symptoms, their side effects, and emotional problems. Palliative care pushes upward to provide mentally fit.

Palliative care is a special type of medical care that focuses on treatment of symptoms people may have when they are living with a chronic (longstanding) illness, such as cancer or heart failure. It is often compared to the hospice care that is offered to terminally ill people. In palliative care, the goal is to provide the best quality of life possible even if someone is not terminally ill.

Palliative care can address a broad range of issues, integrating an individual’s specific needs into care. The physical and emotional effects of cancer and its treatment may be very different from person to person. For example, differences in age, cultural background, or support systems may result in very different palliative care needs.

Hospice and Palliative Care is the active, expert and gentle care and support of individuals living with a serious, progressive illness when cure is not expected. This is the holistic in nature – caring for the ‘’whole’’ person and their family. The aims of hospice and palliative care are to support and improve quality of life for those in the last stage of living, and their families. This offers social, emotional and spiritual support to individuals and families through members of an interdisciplinary team including physicians, nurses, social workers, home care nursing, home support, Hospice staff and volunteers, and other disciplines. Palliative care may be offered for people with illnesses, such as like: Cancer, Heart disease, Lung diseases, Kidney failure, Dementia, HIV/AIDS, ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) etc.

Palliative care that improves the quality of life and quality of care for patients with life threatening or life-limiting sickness and their families through the prevention and relief of suffering, communication about goals of care, and early identification and assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.

End-of-life care is care taking place in the last part of a patient’s life, typically in the last few months, depending on the primary diagnosis and clinical course and includes planning for end-of-life care.